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Campus members continue to address Admin’s use of racial slur

Annette+Cordero+%28right%29+speaks+during+the+Academic+Senate+meeting+held+on+Wednesday%2C+Nov.+28%2C+at+the+Business+Communications+Center+at+City+College+in+Santa+Barbara%2C+Calif.+Cordero+is+an+Assistant+Professor+at+City+College+and+has+been+affiliated+with+the+college+since+she+graduated+high+school.
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Campus members continue to address Admin’s use of racial slur

Annette Cordero (right) speaks during the Academic Senate meeting held on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Business Communications Center at City College in Santa Barbara, Calif. Cordero is an Assistant Professor at City College and has been affiliated with the college since she graduated high school.

Annette Cordero (right) speaks during the Academic Senate meeting held on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Business Communications Center at City College in Santa Barbara, Calif. Cordero is an Assistant Professor at City College and has been affiliated with the college since she graduated high school.

Alejandro Gonzalez Valle

Annette Cordero (right) speaks during the Academic Senate meeting held on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Business Communications Center at City College in Santa Barbara, Calif. Cordero is an Assistant Professor at City College and has been affiliated with the college since she graduated high school.

Alejandro Gonzalez Valle

Alejandro Gonzalez Valle

Annette Cordero (right) speaks during the Academic Senate meeting held on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Business Communications Center at City College in Santa Barbara, Calif. Cordero is an Assistant Professor at City College and has been affiliated with the college since she graduated high school.

Delaney Smith, Editor-in-Chief

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Following an administrator’s use of the n-word at a Gender Equity Workgroup meeting, the Academic Senate held an emotionally charged discussion Wednesday about how to address the issue.

Several black students, faculty, staff and members of two “Coalition for Justice” groups spoke to the Board of Trustees Nov. 19 in response to the racial slur. One demand of the coalition groups to the board was for Vice President of Business Services Lyndsay Maas to immediately resign for using the slur and harming black students and faculty. Maas used the un-abbreviated word when she was quoting a student who had used it as hate speech towards a black student. 

Although Maas is on unpaid leave until Nov. 30 and has committed to taking a number of anti-racist trainings, the college continued to look for ways to further address the issue at Wednesday’s senate meeting.

“The college has always felt like home to me, but I have to admit that drastically changed in 2015 after another incident like this one,” said English assistant-professor Annette Cordero.

“It completely opened my eyes to who my colleagues actually were…I couldn’t walk onto campus without bursting into tears and I feel like that again right now,” she said, crying as she spoke. “You cannot say you support [black students and faculty] and then deny their requests.”

Over twenty people spoke on the issue. All but two voiced that they wanted Maas to resign from the college.

“The context of a word is crucial,” said physics chair Mike Young. “Lyndsay Maas did not use it as hate speech. I don’t see her being terminated or leaving her job because of it being an appropriate response.”

Economics chair Ruth Morales vehemently disagreed with Young and Faculty Association President Cornelia Alsheimer, who also said Maas shouldn’t lose her job.

Because Maas walked out of the meeting after multiple people urged her to stay and address the issue, Morales said, Maas failed at her job as an administrator regardless of the context of the word.

“For all of those saying that Lyndsay shouldn’t be terminated, this is just more of the same,” she said.

“Imagine if that were a black woman talking about Jews. She would have been terminated. And the system would’ve just moved along with her termination or resignation,” she added.

Akil Hill, an admissions and records staff member, spoke about the responsibility of college members to check in with those who have been impacted by Maas’ use of the racial slur.

“If someone is my colleague or coworker and I care about them and know something derogatory was dropped about them, it is my right that they have on me that I actually speak to them and check in with them,” Hill said.

He added that Superintendent-President Anthony Beebe should not have given Lyndsay Maas more of a voice on the issue than the people she impacted by attaching her apology to his campus-wide email on the matter.

“The people that she hurt the most have no voice because he gave it to her,” he said.

Several people in the room snapped their fingers in support after he spoke, which they did throughout the meeting for anyone who spoke in support of the demands of the Coalition for Justice groups.

The coalition groups also demanded for there to be an entity independent of the college responsible for reviewing harassment claims and determining the appropriate responses.

Several people spoke in support of this, including Hill. Interim Executive Vice President Pamela Ralston, former Senate President Kim Monda, Student Program Advisor Chelsea Lancaster, former Senator Raeanne Napoleon and Librarian Ellen Carey were among those who supported hiring an independent entity.

Another demand of the coalitions was for ongoing anti-racism training for members of the Board of Trustees, Deans and all other full and part time members of City College.

Paige Miller (right), a part-time biology instructor at City College, speaks during the Academic Senate meeting held on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Business Communications Center at City College in Santa Barbara, Calif. Miller has taught at City College for 11 years.

Alejandro Gonzalez Valle
Paige Miller (right), a part-time biology instructor at City College, speaks during the Academic Senate meeting held on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Business Communications Center at City College in Santa Barbara, Calif. Miller has taught at City College for 11 years.

Paige Miller, a part-time biology instructor at City College who also works at UCSB, said UCSB doesn’t have the same problems because everyone goes through training.

“I applied for a full-time position in the biological sciences some years ago, but after talking to my colleagues I realized I don’t ever want to be here full-time,” Miller said, her voice intensifying as she continued.

“One of the inherent problems of this institution is that people are not being vetted properly for the position they’re in,” she said. “And then they have not been continued to be trained properly to expand their minds.

“The idea that no one here is expected to do that is shocking.”

 

Editor’s Note:

This story has been changed from a previous version to add a clarification on the context in which the word was used. 

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18 Comments

18 Responses to “Campus members continue to address Admin’s use of racial slur”

  1. Mark McIntire on November 29th, 2018 12:18 am

    Lynching Lindsay Maas will not appease this blood-thirsty mob. Once tasting blood, they will move on to president Anthony E. Beebe, and then the Board of Trustees. This mob of Social Justice Warrior Loony-Leftists want to install a like minded administration to replace Dr. Beebe. If they succeed, SBCC is in the toilet. Women and children first to the lifeboats. Salsipuedes (get out while you can) This is a cruel knife fight in a dark ally over control of the dark alley. It degrades the college, depresses SBCC Foundation Donations, and turns the entire college into the Salem witch hunt. Full disclosure, Mark McIntire was born in Salem, Massachusetts.

    — Cordially
    Mark McIntire
    Taxpayer

  2. Mike Young on November 29th, 2018 6:24 am

    For clarity, the n-word can be, and sadly is at times, used as hate speech. Our VP said, and I paraphrase, “…students on campus feel unsafe because the hear the word n****r”. This is not hate-speech. Hence, I can’t support a call to have her resign.

  3. Friend of SBCC on November 29th, 2018 7:44 am

    Oh look, here’s Mark, burning the midnight oil with his opinions that no one cares out, minus a few homeschooled Incels, that is.
    Do Uber drivers pay taxes? Really? Life is so hard as a white male these days…

  4. Alex Madajian on November 29th, 2018 8:31 am

    If the college does this every-time a naughty word is spoken (even if it’s in an educational context), what will they do when someone actually does something evil? The bigotry on campus is not against skin color, but people who hold different ideas.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmSOpcJ2KJ8

    I wish I was wrong, but this incident is only further proof the SJWs on campus don’t care about Truth or Justice (let alone the American way), but only power. They will stomp over anybody, even their own fellow leftists, to get their way.

  5. Alex Madajian on November 29th, 2018 10:10 am

    WHHAAATT??? Homeschooled Incels?!?! How DARE they! We must find these homeschooled incels and white-shame them away from agreeing with professor McIntire! We can’t have different opinions at a college! And we most certainly can’t have opinions from white people! Or Armenian people for that matter. Even though they may be one of the most historically oppressed people in the world, they look white, so they all must be benefactors of white privilege, and we must treat them as such. Don’t bother having open and civil dialogue with them! They are just too stupid to understand people who were publicly educated.

  6. Brandon Bernstein on November 29th, 2018 12:36 pm

    Mike Young-you actually weren’t at the Gender Equity meeting, so you recounting what the VP said and how she said it doesn’t add to the conversation. You were told yesterday that you don’t get to decide what hate speech it. With this in mind-stop doing it.

  7. mike young on November 29th, 2018 2:30 pm

    The paper made it clear she was quoting a student – quoting the N-word is not hate speech.

    https://www.thechannels.org/news/2018/11/20/coalition-demands-administrator-resignation-after-using-racial-slur/

  8. Jaye on November 29th, 2018 6:19 pm

    “Systemic racism” appears to have partisan underpinnings, according to these recent findings. Good topic for further campus discussion:

    Quote: “White liberals “patronize” minorities while white conservatives use the same vocabulary no matter who they are speaking to, a study by researchers from Yale and Princeton found.

    Democratic candidates used fewer competence-related words in speeches delivered to mostly minority audiences than they did in speeches delivered to mostly white audiences.’
    “White liberals self-present less competence to minorities than to other whites – that is, they patronize minorities stereotyped as lower status and less competent,” according to the study.

    The study, which will be published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, examined speeches over the past 25 years by Republican and Democratic presidential candidates to mostly white and mostly minority audiences. Unquote.

  9. James on November 29th, 2018 8:41 pm

    lots of rap songs have the N-word in it. if I quoted a rap song (because I wanted to rap it) and it had the N-word in it, would that be considered hate speech?

  10. James G on November 29th, 2018 8:45 pm

    Using the N-word in a rap song? I guess it does make you a racist…: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNdUMPr2IQE

  11. Does anyone care? on November 29th, 2018 9:29 pm

    Thank goodness we have all these white people–who haven’t the faintest clue what it’s like to be on the receiving end of such hate speech, intentional or not–to do so much talking and so little listening. And there’s icing on our latent racism cake! Mark McIntire, former porn star and lunatic instructor (not professor) who wouldn’t go away, and his sidekick Alex, the Prince of the Victim Complex, are here to blow some more hot air our way. Aren’t we just the luckiest?

  12. Kathy on November 29th, 2018 9:49 pm

    In English, we have filler words like “umm” or “uhh” to fill up space in our sentences when we’re trying to think of something to say. Chinese ppl have a similar word too, and it sounds JUST LIKE the N-word. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqmO4yvoXwQ

    In Cantonese, 那個 means “that one” and is pronounced like “Nàgè.” also sounds like the N word. (i use this phrase when ordering dim sum)

    In Korean, 내가 means “I” or “me” and is pronounced naegá. also sounds like the N word.

    Try listening in on soke intl students’ conversation and you might be able to hear some of these words.

  13. Sasha on November 30th, 2018 12:03 am
  14. Maycie on November 30th, 2018 12:56 am

    Y’all wild

  15. Elizabeth Singson on November 30th, 2018 12:30 pm

    Well, I think I am seeing some patterns here that are disturbing. Those, like “Friend of SBCC” and “Does anyone care?” are clearly upset about something someone said when they weren’t even around! Oh my, what would happen to them if they found out the N-word was being used THOUSANDS OF TIMES A DAY without people being fired?!? I think they might go mad!!

    Seriously, has SBCC EVER kicked out a student for using the N-word? What about the A-word, B-word, C-word, D-word, E-word, F-words, or any other -words? If so, why?!?! Was it said in a threatening manner? If so, then yeah, I think they need booting EVEN IF THEY DON’T USE ANY OF THOSE WORDS!! But from what I have read in ALL the papers and such, the lady that used it wasn’t using it in a threatening, menacing, mean or derogatory way. She was using it by QUOTING what someone else was saying while talking about a way to deal with someone who was using the word in a mean and derogatory way.

    What will be next, banning the word “black” also? after all, it’s derogatory… Blackmailed, blackballed, blacklisted, black market, black magic, black sheep and so on… So, let’s get rid of that word too.

    Oh, and we’ll have to get rid of white too so it’s balanced out, right? And Brown… aww heck, lets just eliminate all words about color, there is no color… Oh, and of course we should NEVER ask someone “Hey, what’s your favorite color?” or ask them if they want their coffee black or their toast ‘dark’.

    People, these are WORDS and while they can be hurtful to others, do you really think using YOUR WORDS (“Fire her”, “she shouldn’t be allowed to be here”) TO HURT THEM BACK is the right thing to do? Sounds like something we try to teach children NOT to do.

    what a world. One word said at one meeting starts a ‘movement’ that will NEVER end up preventing the use of the word on our campus, in our city, or our state or our country or the world.

    Ban these too:
    “long time no see” (origin was to sound ‘Chinese’)
    Gypped (offensive to gypsies)
    Shyster
    “White men can’t shoot” – Think it’s time to have that movie removed too!
    “White Privilege” – After all, it’s offensive to white people
    Whitey, Anglo, Cracker, Gomer, Goober, Gilligan, Gringo, Hayseed, Redneck, Honkey, Haole, Marshmallow, Mayo, Mouse, N.L.B. (look it up) and all the other words used by ‘people of color’ to offend white people… Don’t you think white people might get their feelings hurt hearing those?

  16. AlanM on November 30th, 2018 12:43 pm

    EDITORS OF THE CHANNELS:

    You are SLURRING and meligning the “Admin” in your title.

    According to the records, although the N-words use was not something she should have said, it wasn’t used to SLUR anyone, therefore it’s NOT a “Racial Slur” any more than most rappers use of it is…

    However, “WHITE PRIVILEGE” is actually a racist term as it’s mean to prejudice people of all races and shows that the user of that term BELIEVES that a particular race is getting something simply because they are a certain color AND that NONE of the other races can get it. Means they do in fact believe that a particular race is superior to another in some way, shape or form. – THAT’S RACISM!!

    Change your title to “Admin uses N-word during meeting about students using N-word” and remove ALL references of “White Privilege” from your site – it’s racist and it’s hurtful towards white people, especially those of us who were NOT privileged growing up.

  17. James on December 1st, 2018 3:23 pm

    1. AlanM is a white guy that’s why he’s saying “white privilege” is racist
    2. “Admin uses N-word during meeting about students using N-word”? newsflash, there weren’t just admin there this is a bad headline.
    3. the meeting wasn’t just about students using the N-word they talked about admin using it too and other things
    4. AlanM doesn’t know how to write a headline

  18. AlanM on December 7th, 2018 4:47 pm

    Yes James, I am a ‘white guy’ and I am OFFENDED by the term “white privilege” and do consider it to be racist as it’s used in context of RACE. On your #2, my title denotes ONE “Admin”, not ADMINS which is the plural. I never said the people at the meeting were ALL admins, but the context used shows that AN Admin used the word. #3, I never said the meeting was ONLY about students using the n-word. Again, you are reading too much into it. The context of the article was that AN Admin used the n-word while discussing (or speaking about?) a student who used the N-word… Therefore, my title can stand on it’s own better than the one used. Or, should it have read ““Admin uses N-word during meeting, about students using N-word” or perhaps “Admin uses N-word during discussion of the N-word being used by students towards other students in the Library at SBCC” Little long for a title, but I am guessing that it wouldn’t matter to you anyway. Points are, 1) She used the word, 2) she did it describing what someone else said 3) the ADMIN didn’t use it to ‘slur’ anyone 4) “White Privilege” IS a racist term and one that perpetuates that there ‘white’ people HAVE privileges that others do not HAVE simply because of their color – again, racist.

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Campus members continue to address Admin’s use of racial slur