Staying calm amid the chaos: Tips to cope with coronavirus anxiety

As+shoppers+stock+up+for+social+distancing%2C+grocery+stores+like+Trader+Joe%27s+struggle+to+keep+items+like+non-perishables%2C+cleaning+supplies+and+toilet+paper+on+the+shelves+on+Friday%2C+March+13%2C+2020+at+Trader+Joe%E2%80%99s+on+N+Milpas+Street+in+Santa+Barbara%2C+Calif.

Nate Stephenson

As shoppers stock up for social distancing, grocery stores like Trader Joe's struggle to keep items like non-perishables, cleaning supplies and toilet paper on the shelves on Friday, March 13, 2020 at Trader Joe’s on N Milpas Street in Santa Barbara, Calif.

Amy Riggs, Staff Writer

In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic and with fears of the fast-spreading disease leading to closures of businesses and increased social distancing, anxiety and stress levels are growing daily. 

Walking into any grocery store, the lack of supplies alone is an ominous reminder of the panic caused by the outbreak of the coronavirus disease.

Some symptoms of anxiety include an increased heart rate, sweating, shortness of breath and a cycle of debilitating fearful thoughts.

Increased anxiety is correlated with increased stress, which can in turn lead to a compromised immune system.

That being said, there are preventive measures to cope with the fear of the coronavirus:

  • Reach out to loved ones.
  • Boost your immune system by staying active and eating a healthy diet.
  • Clean the space around you.
  • Get disinfectant supplies. 
  • Consistent hand washing.
  • Listen to unbiased news, facts rather than opinion. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization are both reputable sources.
  • Seek support.

The Well has collaborated with Student Health 101 online to give helpful tips on how to practice self-care.

Everyone has their own version of self-care — it is whatever brings ease to the mind or physical well-being. 

During times of stress, people may lose themselves in the chaos, which can result in both mental and physical distress.

This can be especially prevalent during the transition from in-person classes to online classes. This switch may be difficult to adjust to, but City College’s faculty and staff are doing everything they can to accomodate students through this transition.

The caution brought upon by the coronavirus is to take care of one’s own health, and that includes mental health. It’s okay to feel anxiety, but individuals should not let this anxiety affect their sanity.

The coronavirus has captured the attention of the world, and it is important to continue to pay attention to yourself as well.