SBCC songwriters host free show

Evan Vogel (right) and Zac Vogel, perform during the free concert put on by the Music 128a class, March 8, 2013, in the Jurkowitz Theatre at Santa Barbara City College.

Justin Covington

Evan Vogel (right) and Zac Vogel, perform during the free concert put on by the Music 128a class, March 8, 2013, in the Jurkowitz Theatre at Santa Barbara City College.

Reghan Jameson, Staff Writer

John Joveth-Jorquia and Jenna Scoggins perform at a free concert set up by the Music Dept. in the Jurkowitz Theatre at Santa Barbara City College Friday, March 8, 2013. Student songwriters from Music 128a taught by John Clark showcased their work.
John Joveth-Jorquia and Jenna Scoggins perform at the free concert.

The free show hosted by the City College’s songwriters class Friday, March 8, was nothing short of student success.

From sounds resembling Ani DiFranco to David Crosby to Jack Johnson, the songwriters course exemplified quality songwriting techniques through the use of their own personal instruments.

The course, MUS128A – Songwriting I, teaches students of all instrumental backgrounds and focuses on areas aside from songwriting. Other skills taught include how to create chord progressions, melodies and lyrics. The comprehensive teaching style gives songwriters a dynamic touch to their compositions.

Musicians interacted and physically mimed the music while playing to the audience, which gave cheerful applause at the conclusion of each performer. The performance was vibrantly serious, but always offered an underbelly of silliness.

Student-musician Erik Stucky described the biggest benefit of the course as having the opportunity to have other “talented musicians. . . critique [his] songs.”

“I feel like I actually understand song structure and the writing process better now,” said Stucky, a 22-year-old student. “Performing in front of them makes me nervous, because I know these are people who understand music.”

The songwriting course integrates big name performers into the curriculum, such as David Crosby, Kenny Loggins and David Page, to give students the opportunity to put personal stories of established writers side by side with their studies.

The pressure to focus on the course for big performers and shows is being used as an incentive to help students learn the material better.

Evan Vogel, 21-year-old graphic design major and vocalist for the performing band Super Space Nation, attributed much of his songwriting success to the course.

“Personally, I feel that when you have unlimited time, you write less,” said Vogel. “But when you’re forced to be creative and motivated about your work, you think more critically about it.”

The success of the class stems even beyond that. John Joveth Jorquia, 21-year-old music major, was able to make a connection with David Page on one of his visits to the songwriting class. The two are now collaboratively working together on Jorquia personal piece, “Beautiful Eyes.”

All in all, it was a performance catered for all music lovers. Whether you’re a fan of beachside tunes or melancholy war stories, it can be assured that these musicians can bring a smile to your face.