SBCC band exhibits superb musical diversity and skill in evening show

Trombonist%2C+Douglas+Swayne+performs+a+cover+of+Frank+Sinatra%27s+song+%22Fly+Me+to+the+Moon%22+on+Sunday%2C+Nov.+3%2C+2019%2C+at+the+SoHo+Restaurant+and+Music+Club+in+Santa+Barbara%2C+Calif.
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SBCC band exhibits superb musical diversity and skill in evening show

Trombonist, Douglas Swayne performs a cover of Frank Sinatra's song

Trombonist, Douglas Swayne performs a cover of Frank Sinatra's song "Fly Me to the Moon" on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019, at the SoHo Restaurant and Music Club in Santa Barbara, Calif.

Jesus Villafranco Perez

Trombonist, Douglas Swayne performs a cover of Frank Sinatra's song "Fly Me to the Moon" on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019, at the SoHo Restaurant and Music Club in Santa Barbara, Calif.

Jesus Villafranco Perez

Jesus Villafranco Perez

Trombonist, Douglas Swayne performs a cover of Frank Sinatra's song "Fly Me to the Moon" on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019, at the SoHo Restaurant and Music Club in Santa Barbara, Calif.

August Lawrence, Staff Writer

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The Monday Madness Big Band rocked the SOhO Club Sunday night, providing an amazing night of live jazz music.

The Monday Madness band, consisting of 18 local pros and advanced City College students, was under the direction of Andrew Martinez. The concert was a showcase that Monday Madness puts on annually at the SOhO Restaurant and Music Club.

“I like the variation of music they played, from bossa to fast jazz,” said concertgoer Marcella Vonneau. “It’s been great seeing them.”

Monday Madness gets its name because they meet every monday night to rehearse.

“It’s Monday Madness on a Sunday,” Martinez joked before counting in the first number.

They started off with the upbeat “Abducted Aliens,” a lively, fun piece that got the house ready for the show and wanting more.

Following came the slowed down, more sensual and flowy bossa nova number called “Hmm.”

With its lulled, steamy and almost heavy vibes, “Hmm” made the listener feel as if they were being led through a hot, muggy jungle.

The band then took the audience back to 1958 with the Frank Sinatra classic, “Come Fly With Me.”

Each song was distinctly different from the others, showing the audience the band’s musical diversity.

The highlight of the night was definitely Monday Madness’ rendition of the Miles Davis’s big band standby, “Oleo.”

The tempo of the song would suddenly change at the drop of a hat, leaving the listeners never bored.

This was also one of two songs that substitute bassist Santino Taferella soloed on. Taferella’s solos received the most applause out of everyone in the band.

“The band sounds great,” Taferella said. “They picked some really hard material… [the songs] were fun to learn.”

Then came the fast paced, thrilling number, “Harlem Nocturne.”

Monday Madness showed their intensity with this number. The members played with such focus and exactitude, not missing a single note.

“We had some special moments. These are all next level pieces,” said lead trumpeter Mike Muench. “It’s jazz, we all stayed together in the end.”

The band then went into a tender rendition of the Roger Skeffington love song, “When I Fall in Love.”

The band swelled and ebbed this slower waltz. By the end of the song most of the couples in the room were arm in arm with each other, rocking to and fro.

“This next one’s a looker,” Martinez said. “This one’s in 7/4th time.”

With the weird timing, strange punctuations and enchanting melodic changes, “Song of George” was probably the most experimental number of the night.

“It was so special getting to see this tonight,” said attendee Claire Juscillo. “I’m glad I came.”

Overall, the City College Monday Madness showcased a truly stupendous night of music, proving their talent and worth.

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