SBCC chamber ensembles display versatility in flurry of lively songs

August Lawrence, Staff Writer

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City College’s wind ensembles blew away their audience Sunday night with a varied performance, featuring song styles ranging from Bach to The Beatles.

The concert was an annual event that showcased the different chamber wind groups at City College.

“Live music is a grab bag,” said Mike Muench, leader of City College’s Trumpet Ensemble. “It’s fun to bring this community together.”

The event took place in the intimate Fellowship Hall of the First United Methodist Church.

Feelings of anticipation and excitement were in the air as the crowd, consisting mostly of family members and older citizens, eagerly awaited for the show to begin.

City College’s Trumpet Ensemble kicked off by taking up positions all around the church hall, completely surrounding the audience. 

“It was an amazing, inspiring experience,” concertgoer Julia Hawthorne said. “It was like being splashed in sound.”

Then came a rather stiff and dull performance by the eighth position trombone octet. 

Players seemed unable to hit certain notes, and the conductor was stiff and moved unnaturally.

Up next, the flute choir performed a selection of four softer, up-tempo and happier pieces. These numbers brought a calming and uplifting mood to the evening

The Woodwind Trio came on after, premiering their modern, jolting piece “Liveware!”

“This piece is inspired by annoyance with electronics,” joked Trio member Johann Trujillo. “I’m sure we all have experienced that!”

The highlight of the night, West City Brass Quintet, dominated the house with its lively set.

The crowd was clapping along and dancing in their seats by the end of the set.

The Trumpet Ensemble, with its more poppy setlist, took the stage next.

“We’re definitely playing more modern, sac-religious songs,” trumpeter Sergio Rodriguez said.

City College’s newest band, Saxophone Quartet, made its premier with a jazzy, four number set.

The quartet performed with beaming smiles on their faces, showing their true joy of playing music.

The evening was brought to a close by the Trombone Choir’s echoey and powerful rendition of Mozart’s “Magic Flute”.

The only problem was the lack of presence and awkwardness from conductor Cody Anderson.

The band was bewitching to watch, the music was pretty to listen, the audience’s reception was positive.

“We really appreciate your coming tonight,” Eric Heidner said at the end. “We do love doing what we do!”

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