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Trustees’ annual report finds SBCC lacking in diversity hires

Daniel Wallace, Associate Editor

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A new report has found that only people who identified themselves as Hispanic or White were hired to management positions and full-time faculty positions at City College last year, despite over a dozen people who identified as Asian and black applying to both groups.

The Board of Trustees was presented with a report on the ethnic diversity of City College’s workforce Thursday by Monalisa Hasson, vice president of human resources. The proportion of full-time faculty at the college who identify as white was found to be almost double the average in community colleges statewide at 71 percent. Although the diversity of management positions was not compared to the state average, about the same proportion — 63 percent — of the group identified as white.

“We had our selection tools reviewed and we scored a zero,” Hasson said.

“The research shows that when you see people who represent who you are as a student, then you’re going to have higher completion rates and a better sense of belonging,” Hasson said.

Interim Student Trustee Kenny Igbechi shared that a black classmate of his last semester told him he wasn’t attending class regularly because the student didn’t have anyone who looked like him in the class.

“I think it is very important to get more black representation on the faculty,” Igbechi added.

Currently, the college has only nine black full-time faculty members and 10 black part-time faculty members, which is only 4 percent of full-timers and 2 percent of part-timers. On average, other colleges in the state have double those proportions of black faculty members.

Among those who applied for full-time faculty positions last year, 18 identified as black, 30 identified as Asian and 10 identified as Native American. None of them were hired, in part because only two faculty members were hired that year.

The numbers are similar for management position applicants, with 19 who identified as black, 25 who identified as Asian and eight who identified as Native American applying last year. None of these people were hired, either, with the nine hires consisting of only Hispanic and white identifying individuals.

Hasson explained that the difficulty of hiring a more diverse workforce stems from the cost of living in the area and the hiring process the college has used.

In its application materials for college positions, it had not stated it was a Hispanic-serving institution, nor had it made clear how many resources the college had for people of color such as the Umoja program.

Recently, the college has been giving out relocation stipends of $2,000 to move in from out of the area, according to Hasson. In addition, the hiring committee members are going through implicit-bias trainings in which members learn to identify and overcome any racial or sex-based stereotypes they have.

Hasson expressed confidence that the more than one dozen faculty positions the college plans to fill in the near future will be more diverse hires.

“If we don’t change to better represent our students, students of color are going to say ‘Santa Barbara is not the place for me,’” she said.

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3 Comments

3 Responses to “Trustees’ annual report finds SBCC lacking in diversity hires”

  1. Mark McIntire on November 9th, 2018 5:37 pm

    Dear Daniel,

    Thank you for yet another professional piece of reporting free from editorial assumptions mixed in like a tossed salad. Of all the sad commentaries I’ve been reading about tax-funded K-College trends, policies and practices, this report from Human Resources Vice-president Hasson is the saddest, and most depressing of all. Reasons?

    The very first paragraph reveals an insidious and invidious assumption that is then presumed in the entire report you reference. The most crippling assumption is that that there is some necessary casual, or even correlative relation between skin color and why a person is hired or not hired. This assumption is a direct contradiction to Dr. Martin Luther King’s oft quoted “I have a dream” speech on August 28, 1963. “ I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” I attend that March on Washington. I heard that speech at the Lincoln Memorial. It electrified a nation and brought us together. Now, arbitrary and capricious group identity policies, training and regulations pull us apart, divide us one against the other and prevent the very thing this report seeks to overcome. As Dr. King pointed out it is the content of individual character not skin color that qualifies any of us to be hired. Character, whether good or bad, is an individual quality not a Marxist collective quality.

    The report’s other cancerous assumption is that superficial qualities such as skin color, or ethnicity or group identifying should be the arbitrary decision metric in hiring. This assumption completely negates the non-material qualities of a person that are far more dispositive to a person than superficial material qualities. To demonstrate the absurdity of this position consider a college policy that would bend hiring to favor tall people, or short people, or left-handed individuals, or any other superficial and accidental quality of an applicant.

    The report also stumbles over itself several times by admitting that there are other factors that explain why certain members of ethnic groups did not in fact get hired over the reporting period. One reason being that no one was hired during a particular reporting period. This invalidates the entire report. It’s worthless.

    Lastly, and most legally questionable of all is the third last paragraph of your article;

    “Recently, the college has been giving out relocation stipends of $2,000 to move in from out of the area, according to Hasson. In addition, the hiring committee members are going through implicit-bias training in which members learn to identify and overcome any racial or sex-based stereotypes they have.”

    Ah, yes. Starting in 2011-2012 the college systemically hired Social Justice Warrior acolytes to fill faculty, staff, and administration openings. In some cases the college created new special positions for them as well all paying six-figures. To pave the way the college paid a Social Justice Warrior indoctrination training company to water board our faculty/staff/admin ‘ Flex-Time’ meeting at semester’s inception. The ‘training’ company is euphemistically titled JUST COMMUNITIES CENTRAL COAST. This is the same organization that just got a 1.5 million dollar contract from the Santa Barbara Unified School District to indoctrinate K-12 students, faculty, and staff into accepting as ‘implicit bias” that white, male, elderly, Christian, able-bodied, wealthy, heterosexual individuals were the ‘oppressors’ in our society that prevented blacks, women, homosexuals, poor, transsexuals from achieving any success in our society. Their official ‘training documents’ state that these oppressors must be ‘dismantled’. How does one ‘dismantle’ white, male, elderly, Christian, able-bodied, wealthy, heterosexuals?

    What the social engineers behind this report do not either understand nor acknowledge is that human freedom cannot be suppressed. Communism/Socialism bankruptcy around the world proves that the more you try to indoctrinate free citizens, the more rebellion you foster in their ranks. Over the years, and just recently, the only way I have learned to stop the indoctrinators from using tax-dollars to suppress academic freedom is to sue them and drag them kicking and screaming though our court system and make them bleed their monetary resources.

    Thanks for the warning, Daniel. The barbarians are already in the citadel.

    — Cordially
    Mark McIntire
    California Tax-payer

  2. J Livingston on November 12th, 2018 11:39 am

    Encouraging ideological diversity is a worthy and education-enriching goal as well.

  3. Elizabeth Singson on November 13th, 2018 3:34 pm

    WOW! What a great article to show bias! Errr… Bias in hiring minorities over better qualified candidates that is.

    “Currently, the college has only nine black full-time faculty members and 10 black part-time faculty members, which is only 4 percent of full-timers and 2 percent of part-timers.”

    So, ONLY 4% are black? And what with the county of Santa Barbara reporting that 2.4% of the population is black, it’s obvious to me that…. wait a second… That’s almost twice the percentage when compared to population here? Something must be wrong here… It just can’t be!!

    And with 85.5 % of the population defining themselves in the “White Alone” census category, shouldn’t we have 85.5% instead of just 73%? Of course not!

    What we NEED to have are the BEST QUALIFIED teachers that are hired based on their SKILLS and KNOWLEDGE and NOT on their race, ethnicity, gender, political affiliation, hair color or anything else! The BEST teachers will give students the BEST educational opportunities.

    That silly statement ““The research shows that when you see people who represent who you are as a student, then you’re going to have higher completion rates and a better sense of belonging,” that Hasson said is ridiculous! I have yet to be in ANY class where my instructor is middle aged lesbian woman with pink and blue hair that loves ice hockey and doesn’t own an iPhone. Yet somehow, I was able to get by just the same. Somehow I was able to overcome alllll those ‘issues’ of ‘diversity’ not being available to me and still LEARN something.

    Of course we could go back to the 50’s and 60’s when teachers were mostly male and they ALL wore button down shirts and ties (and usually a jacket)… Or so my mother tells me anyway… She was somehow able to get her Masters as well, even when ‘women’ were hardly teaching any classes at all! Weird, huh?

    Give students the best QUALIFIED teachers and not the most ‘diverse’ ones.

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Trustees’ annual report finds SBCC lacking in diversity hires