Review: Zlotksy’s ‘Lifelike’ distorts perceptions of nature

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Review: Zlotksy’s ‘Lifelike’ distorts perceptions of nature

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Tina Kerrigan, who works for the Alpha Resource Center of Santa Barbara, Calif. and came to the City College Atkinson Gallery with her workgroup, enjoys the artwork made by Debora Zlotsky.

Skylar Serge, Staff Writer

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“Lifelike,” a new series by artist Deborah Zlotsky, veers away from color and diverges into a distorted vision of nature, taking on its own persona.

Zlotsky takes her work to a more emotional and delicate place carrying her art into the minds of her viewers and creeping into the depths of their curiosity.

The Atkinson Gallery has been filled with 28 new works of Zlotsky’s powdered graphite drawings, ranging from small 5 inch by  4 inch frames to large 22 inch  x 20 inch masterpieces.

“Smool,” one of the larger works in this series, features what seems to be a man’s face distorted and disfigured into something almost unrecognizable. Using blown-up graphite on Mylar, a smooth paper, Zlotsky’s drawings look more like grey watercolor seeping into different forms and figures than pencil on paper.

The inspiration for this series is expressive with simple lines shaped into different forms of energy. Zlotsky describes her process as trying to uncover unexpected anomalies, adjusting relationships of objects and being fearless of making accidents.

At first glance, the work “Membling” looks like the profile of a horse but with exaggerated and obscure features making it more complex and intriguing.

Reshaping and reconfiguring her artwork seems to be a trend, whether it be in her paintings or drawings. Zlotsky incorporates the past, present and future in her series by manipulating, erasing and blurring her drawings, establishing a connection with each admirer as they wander through the gallery.

The technique Zlotsky uses creates an abstract perspective for the viewer. By morphing parts of nature into blended lines and smooth textures Zlotsky provides a sense of nostalgia and allows her observers to pick apart her work and turn it into something they love.

As a recipient of many awards, including a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in 2012, and work displayed in hotels such as the Waldorf Astoria and the Palace in New York City, Zlotsky’s work is widely recognized in the art community.

Zlotsky’s works are being displayed from Aug. 30 through Sept.r 27 in the Atkinson Gallery on West Campus at SBCC.

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