Tiger should be left alone

Christopher Sugarman

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Unless you have been standing in a sand trap for the last couple months, you know about Tiger Woods’ infamous sex addiction scandal.

He not only ran his Escalade over a hydrant and into a tree, he ran his reputation into a ditch. Someone needs to shed light on the American public’s perception on golf’s mega-superstar.

Yes, he did cheat on his wife, Elin, with several different women. Yes, he lied. Yes, he committed infidelity. And yes, he had extramarital affairs. But every year many people cheat on their significant others.

I am sure of one thing, Tiger, you’re not the only one.

Just because Tiger is the world’s best golfer and an icon for the sport – winning PGA player of the year ten times, 73 tournaments, 14 being majors – doesn’t mean he should feel the wrath of the American public and media.

Tiger’s scandal doesn’t seem any worse than what other professional athletes have done.

Los Angeles poster child Kobe Bryant was accused of sexually assaulting and raping a woman in a Colorado hotel room. Afterwards, Bryant negotiated a monetary settlement with her.

Or what about NHL All-Star, and member of the Canadian National team, Dany Heatley? Heatley was driving at excessive speeds when he crashed his Ferrari and killed his teammate Dan Snyder. What Tiger has done is not moral, but it isn’t something to lose endorsements over.

A person who cheats on their spouse should not get fired from their job. Tiger is an icon and is looked upon by millions of little cubs that want to be like him. He’s a sports idol, not a how-to-live-your-personal-life role model. No one looks at him and thinks, “Now that’s how I want my son to live his personal life like when he’s an adult.”

Tiger is a golfer, the best to ever play the game. That is why he got the big sponsorships from Nike, AT&T, Buick, Gatorade, Gillette and Tag Heuer. Whether you like it or not, Tiger Woods is going to return to golf. He was what made golf popular.

Tournaments that are lucky enough to book him to play rake in large amounts of cash.

Tiger may never be the cultural phenomenon he was before he became an American punch line, but he will continue to win more tournaments and majors than any other golfer before him. He is that good.

So instead of making him the butt of late-night talk show jokes, we should embrace Tiger Woods. When he’s ready to return to golf, he should be welcomed back with open arms.

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